Chocolatta Brides

Im a Singer Songwriter disguised as a Graphic Designer who has secret obsessive bridal fashion art directional disorder. Think MochaChocolattayaya Think wedding & love inspiration, scrumptuously beautiful brides of african descent, Think melanistic women first for a change ahem. Think Haute couture, originality, ancient, culture, vintage, retro, contemporary, avant, unconventional beautiful.

Curation by Honey Williams

AN AFRICAN PRINCESS WHO STOOD UNAFRAID AMONG NAZISHer autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now. Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.In her final chapter, Massaquoi, writing in 1946, reflects on her experience in the United States:“This vast country has everything good and evil. It has sympathetic men and women, who can be as selfish as they can be kind. There is, in the words of Goethe, ‘much light,’ but also ‘much shade.’ But in spite of all this, freedom here is incomparable; no wonder then that the Negro can be lynched, and yet a Negro can stand and sing ‘My Country ’Tis of Thee.’ There is very much to learn from the United States, if we can scratch the varnish off the surface and take the woodwork that is solid and not rotten.”SOURCE: http://wapo.st/1cb8049THE BOOK: http://amzn.to/1aLGXvp
 
AN AFRICAN PRINCESS WHO STOOD UNAFRAID AMONG NAZIS

Her autobiography is a one-of-a-kind perspective of an educated, empowered, world-traveling daughter of a royal family, which no one wanted to publish until now. Between 1939 and 1946, Fatima Massaquoi penned one of the earliest known autobiographies by an African woman. But few outside of Liberian circles were aware of it until this week, when Palgrave McMillian published The Autobiography of an African Princess, edited by two historians and the author’s daughter.

In her final chapter, Massaquoi, writing in 1946, reflects on her experience in the United States:

“This vast country has everything good and evil. It has sympathetic men and women, who can be as selfish as they can be kind. There is, in the words of Goethe, ‘much light,’ but also ‘much shade.’ But in spite of all this, freedom here is incomparable; no wonder then that the Negro can be lynched, and yet a Negro can stand and sing ‘My Country ’Tis of Thee.’ There is very much to learn from the United States, if we can scratch the varnish off the surface and take the woodwork that is solid and not rotten.”

SOURCE: http://wapo.st/1cb8049
THE BOOK: http://amzn.to/1aLGXvp